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Adding New Features Edit Page


In general, new feature development should be done on master.

Bugfixes should not introduce new APIs or break existing APIs, and do not need feature flags.

Features can introduce new APIs, and need feature flags. They should not be applied to the release or beta branches, since SemVer requires bumping the minor version to introduce new features.

Security fixes should not introduce new APIs, but may, if strictly necessary, break existing APIs. Such breakages should be as limited as possible.

Bug Fixes

Urgent Bug Fixes

Urgent bugfixes are bugfixes that need to be applied to the existing release branch. If possible, they should be made on master and prefixed with [BUGFIX release].

Beta Bug Fixes

Beta bugfixes are bugfixes that need to be applied to the beta branch. If possible, they should be made on master and tagged with [BUGFIX beta].

Security Fixes

Security fixes need to be applied to the beta branch, the current release branch, and the previous tag. If possible, they should be made on master and tagged with [SECURITY].

Features

Features must always be wrapped in a feature flag. Tests for the feature must also be wrapped in a feature flag.

Because the build-tools will process feature-flags, flags must use precisely this format. We are choosing conditionals rather than a block form because functions change the surrounding scope and may introduce problems with early return.

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if (Ember.FEATURES.isEnabled("feature")) {
  // implementation
}

Tests will always run with all features on, so make sure that any tests for the feature are passing against the current state of the feature.

Commits

Commits related to a specific feature should include a prefix like [FEATURE htmlbars]. This will allow us to quickly identify all commits for a specific feature in the future. Features will never be applied to beta or release branches. Once a beta or release branch has been cut, it contains all of the new features it will ever have.

If a feature has made it into beta or release, and you make a commit to master that fixes a bug in the feature, treat it like a bugfix as described above.

Feature Naming Conventions

config/environment.js
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Ember.FEATURES['<packageName>-<feature>'] // if package specific
Ember.FEATURES['container-factory-injections']
Ember.FEATURES['htmlbars']

Builds

The Canary build, which is based off master, will include all features, guarded by the conditionals in the original source. This means that users of the canary build can enable whatever features they want by enabling them before creating their Ember.Application.

config/environment.js
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module.exports = function(environment) {
  var ENV = {
    EmberENV: {
      FEATURES: {
        htmlbars: true
      }
    },
  }
}

features.json

The root of the repository will contain a features.json file, which will contain a list of features that should be enabled for beta or release builds.

This file is populated when branching, and may not gain additional features after the original branch. It may remove features.

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{
  "htmlbars": true
}

The build process will remove any features not included in the list, and remove the conditionals for features in the list.

Travis Testing

For a new PR:

  1. Travis will test against master with all feature flags on.
  2. If a commit is tagged with [BUGFIX beta], Travis will also cherry-pick the commit into beta, and run the tests on that branch. If the commit doesn't apply cleanly or the tests fail, the tests will fail.
  3. If a commit is tagged with [BUGFIX release], Travis will also cherry-pick the commit into release, and run the test on that branch. If the commit doesn't apply cleanly or the tests fail, the tests will fail.

For a new commit to master:

  1. Travis will run the tests as described above.
  2. If the build passes, Travis will cherry-pick the commits into the appropriate branches.

The idea is that new commits should be submitted as PRs to ensure they apply cleanly, and once the merge button is pressed, Travis will apply them to the right branches.

Go/No-Go Process

Every six weeks, the core team goes through the following process.

Beta Branch

All remaining features on the beta branch are vetted for readiness. If any feature isn't ready, it is removed from features.json.

Once this is done, the beta branch is tagged and merged into release.

Master Branch

All features on the master branch are vetted for readiness. In order for a feature to be considered "ready" at this stage, it must be ready as-is with no blockers. Features are a no-go even if they are close and additional work on the beta branch would make it ready.

Because this process happens every six weeks, there will be another opportunity for a feature to make it soon enough.

Once this is done, the master branch is merged into beta. A features.json file is added with the features that are ready.

Beta Releases

Every week, we repeat the Go/No-Go process for the features that remain on the beta branch. Any feature that has become unready is removed from the features.json.

Once this is done, a Beta release is tagged and pushed.